Beer 511

Exploring Craft Beer and Homebrew in Peru (Country Code 51) and the USA (Country Code 1)

Category: Peru Beer Page 1 of 6

Peruvian medalists at Copa Cervecera del Pacifico (Ensenada, Mexico)

The Copa Cervecera del Pacifico craft beer cup recently wrapped up in Ensenda, Baja California, Mexico. Although, of course, it mainly received entries from, mostly western, Mexico, it did count with the participation of a few breweries from further afield: USA, Chile, Ecuador, Colombia, Peru.

Of the Peruvian participants, two took home medals.

One is Lemaire Cerveceria, which garnered a silver medal for its Belgian Blonde Ale. Lemaire Cerveceria is the brainchild of Yann Lemaire, one of the partners who started Cerveceria Nuevo Mundo in Lima and has recently started production under his own name.

The other is Pacha Cerveza Artesanal, run by Adrian Calle Silva, who took home a bronze medal in the Specialty IPA category with his Piel Roja red IPA.

Congrats to them both!

Lupulager by Barranco Beer

My wife recently returned from Lima and she brought me back two cans of beer from the Barranco Beer Company.

Barranco Beer Company introduced canning to the Peruvian craft beer industry with a couple of releases last year in time for the soccer World Cup and Peru’s Independence Day holiday. They have since expanded canning to almost their entire line of regular brews.

Of the two I received, I’ve so far tried the can of Lupulager.

Luplager is a dry-hopped beer fermented with lager yeast at “low fermentation temperatures”. It comes in at 38 IBU and 5% abv.

Lupulager is an example of a developing style that in the US we would call an “India Pale Lager”. It won a silver medal in the “Specialty IPA” category at the Copa Latinoamericana de Cervezas Artesanales (Latin American Craft Beer Cup) held in Lima in February 2018.

Upon pouring, the beer produced a big, rocky, long-lasting head with lots of lacing. The brew itself was golden and clear, with a bit of what I took to be chill haze. As befits the name, it is somewhat more bitter than “standard” lagers.

It finishes with a note of straw or hay, followed by a sharp, lingering hop bitternes. The flavors smoothed out as time passed and the beer off-gassed and warmed up in the glass.

Overall, I liked it almost as much in the can as I did on tap at the brewery.

(Just for reference, my can was packaged on November 19th, 2018, and I drank it a week before its “best by” date in February.)

Barihuait Barley Wine by Nuevo Mundo (Lima, Peru)

A few days ago I popped open a bottle of Barihuait Barley Wine that I had brought back from Lima five months ago and carefully stowed in my fridge.

The beer held up pretty well. It presented with a low hop aroma and was initially quite effervescent, with a head that dissipated quickly. There was some lacing but it fell almost immediately.

The brew was malty and a little sweet, with sharp bitterness and pronounced hop flavor evident with first draught. There were also some pleasant fruit and caramel notes in there. It had pleasantly bitter finish that hung around for a bit on the palate.

The beer improved as it warmed (I’d had it stored at 47°F) and some of the effervescence dissipated. The flavor seemed fuller, and rounder at the warmer temperatures.

Being a barley wine Barihuait comes in high in both abv and ibu – 9.5% and 60, respectively. It is brewed by Cerveceria Nuevo Mundo, in Lima’s Surquillo district. It was one of the first Peruvian craft beers I encountered a few years ago and remains one of my favorites.

The name, incidentally, came about by happenstance, as once explained to me by Alain, one of the French partners who started the brewery (he’s since moved on to focus on his other business, high-end chocolates). When explaining the style to Peruvian friends, he said, one of them exclaimed that “barley wine” sounded like “Bari Huait” –Barry White, said phonetically in Spanish– and the name stuck!

Online Book: “The Beer Market in Peru”


The Beer Market in Peru (January 2018, 42 pages), an analysis of the Peruvian beer market published by the Lima office of the Flanders Investment & Trade agency.

Pacha Cerveza Artesanal’s “Piel Roja”

Today I am offering my impressions of Piel Roja from Pacha Cerveza Artesanal. This bottle was given to me by Pacha’s owner and brewer, Adrián Calle, during my visit to the Red Cervecera Perú’s brewpub in August, and I’ve been saving it cold until now.

Piel Roja is an 40 IBU, 6.5% abv, India Red Ale, a style also known as a Red IPA. It is a deep copper or light brown, somewhere in the range of 18-20 SRM.  The name of the beer, Piel Roja, which in English we’d translate as Redskin, is an allusion to the style and color of the beer.

Upon pouring hop and citrus  aromas waft out of the glass even before it is put to the nose.  The white foam subsides quickly but is easily rousted again.  Lacing present when the glass is swirled, but it doesn’t hold for long. That said, my bottle was appropriately carbonated,

Upon savouring, maltiness and hop bitterness are the first impressions, followed by a light roastyness.  It is a medium-bodied, mildly dry beer. Grapefruit and pine notes last in the mouth beyond the latest sip.  Piel Roja is a solidly done, enjoyable brew.

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